Wednesday, February 21Royal Holloway's offical student publication, est. 1986

Tag: jobs

Class Inequality is Still Rife in Cultural Industries – But is there Reason for Hope?
Culture & Literature

Class Inequality is Still Rife in Cultural Industries – But is there Reason for Hope?

Picture it. Your best friend is interning at the [insert name of fabulous workplace]. You ask how they got such a prestigious internship when you didn’t even see it advertised. Your question is genuine. You’re not trying to catch them out. For half a second you really believe there’s some big job site you don’t know about or an opportunity you’ve missed. Your friend blushes and doesn’t answer.  Suddenly you understand. It’s one of those internships.  … The cultural industries are notoriously hard to break into. Every parent faced with a child who wants to be an actor will tell you. Even if we all have the same 24 hours in a day (thanks for the reminder, Molly-Mae) that certainly doesn’t mean we’re all looking at a level playing field. This is a world where unpaid ...
The Value of Internships
Opinion

The Value of Internships

Internships are a great way for university students to gain practical experience and skills to prepare them for graduation, and are key to building a network of contacts and industry knowledge in a field that perhaps their degree doesn’t offer them. That being said, are all these internships worth their salt? We’ve all seen the internship and graduate job descriptions brandished under the alluring title ‘opportunity’ that incorporate the key phrases “entry level”, “must have X number of years experience” and “unpaid”. It would seem the reward is heavily disproportionate to the skills the intern would be providing the company. It’s a Catch 22 scenario — you’re applying for something to give you the experience, but are being denied the opportunity because of your lack of experience. No...
Publishers ‘Penguin’ ditch degree requirement for employees
News

Publishers ‘Penguin’ ditch degree requirement for employees

Global publishing group Penguin Random House has announced it no longer requires job candidates to hold a university degree. The announcement comes as an attempt to attract a more diverse range of candidates into publishing, an industry that has been previously criticised for its lack of diversity. The move follows a similar announcement made by accountancy firm Ernst & Young, one of Britain’s biggest graduate recruiters, who announced last August that it would no longer be considering degree or A-level results when assessing potential employees. It follows concerns that basing the selection process on requiring a degree and recruiting from particular universities was producing too narrow a range of staff. PricewaterhouseCoopers also announced plans to ditch A-level results...