Friday, June 14Royal Holloway's offical student publication, est. 1986

Tag: tuition fees

Everyone’s Favourite Worst Nightmare – Tuition Fees
Features

Everyone’s Favourite Worst Nightmare – Tuition Fees

Features Editor, Dominic Barrett, discusses the love-hate relationship with university tuition fees. Ask any current university student if they’re looking forward to the prospect of leaving university with a veritable mountain of debt and you’d probably find out pretty quickly just how much they are not looking forward to facing it. That’s not that surprising, but maybe there is another way to look at university fees that might make you feel a little better about them. If you take a quick look at the Labour Manifesto for 2017, a point that might stick out to you is where it specifies that tuition fees for universities should be abolished. That’s great, and would avoid the scenario of leaving university with a whole load of debt. Obviously, this is good news - no disagreement from thi...
Tuition Fee Hikes announced by Universities before Commons Debate
News

Tuition Fee Hikes announced by Universities before Commons Debate

A list of universities, including Royal Holloway, have announced increases in their tuition fees though a Parliamentary debate on the issue is still ongoing. Royal Holloway, Kent, and Durham universities have listed the cost for undergraduate students in 2017 will be £9,250, an almost 3% increase from the £9,000 cap imposed by the coalition government in 2012. The revelations come prematurely, with a debate on the exact direction of the tuition fee hikes still ongoing in Parliament. Royal Holloway have accordingly listed the increased tuition cost as being “subject to government confirmation”. This comes amid the introduction of new higher education legislation, which states that universities meeting a necessary standard of education will be allowed to increase their fees in line ...
News

The UK higher education system’s best kept secret: How are our tuition fees spent?

According to the influential think tank, Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI), the majority of the UK’s leading universities are refusing to publish a breakdown of how each student’s £9,000 per year tuition fees are spent. HEPI contacted a range of institutions in order to uncover where students’ money goes, however according to director Nick Hillman, only ten universities responded to their inquiries. Leicester University, one of few to reply, indicates how it divvies up some of its £274 million annual budget, spending £168 million on academic colleges compared to just £16 million on libraries and computers. However, they failed to itemise how an individual student’s tuition fees are used. Hillman argues that if universities refuse to itemize how earnings are allocated, they ...
News

NUS Withdraws support for tuition fees demonstration

The National Union of Students has withdrawn its support for a demonstration against university tuition fees scheduled for the 19th of November over safety concerns. The march is expected to be the largest student demonstration since the riotous march against fees in 2010. The protest which has been organised by the National Campaign Against Fees and Cuts in conjunction with the Student Assembly Against Austerity, will march on Westminster, reportedly with thousands of students from around the country expected to join. The campaign looks to Germany for inspiration, as last month the German government scrapped tuition fees. The campaign organisers suggest that this is a prime example of the possibility of free education, and that though we are told there is no alternative to huge hikes i...