Friday, August 12

Tag: Education

Who Really Gets to Be a Scientist? An Interview with Angela Saini
Science & Technology

Who Really Gets to Be a Scientist? An Interview with Angela Saini

Does it now take three or four minutes to race up to the moon? Is that really important? Or should science be used for what we actually need in order to pursue human development, such as finding new ways to produce crops, combat climate change, and so on? Because how realistic is it really for someone, who had to work themselves up from the very bottom, to get funding for a flying race car? Unless your name is Elon Musk, the odds are terrible and incredibly unfair. And this shouldn’t be the case. Regardless of socio-economic background, or gender, or race. Everyone can be a scientist. So what is stopping us? Last Monday, I was sitting in my maths seminar when this guy suddenly told me that women are biologically less capable of logical thinking than men. I couldn’t believe what I was h...
University is No Longer About the Degree Alone
News, Opinion

University is No Longer About the Degree Alone

How to Tackle the State-Private Education Divide, an Interview with the 93% Club. By Accalia Smith At the 1996 Labour Party conference, Tony Blair infamously stated that his three top priorities when coming into office were “education, education, and education”. Indeed, it was a large part of New Labour’s manifesto and although largely adopting the previous Conservative education policies, he did make many changes whilst Prime Minister from 1997 to 2007. This included increasing support and teacher training schemes, and crucially “a 50 per cent target for university participation among young adults”. This emphasis on the importance of education caused a huge influx in university attendees. Choosing university was no longer the exception but rather the expectation. Blair’s son, Eau...
Is it all ‘Fun with Flags’ for Royal Holloway’s Silver TEF Award?
News

Is it all ‘Fun with Flags’ for Royal Holloway’s Silver TEF Award?

Editor, Abbie Cheeseman, discusses what Royal Holloway's Silver TEF Award really means. The results of the 2017 Teaching Excellence Framework were released today and Royal Holloway achieved a silver award. What is the Teaching Excellence Framework? The framework, which is overseen by the Department for Education, was introduced last year to recognise and reward excellent teaching. It also serves as a tool to help students make informed choices on where to study. According to HEFCE (Higher Education Funding Council for England), a silver award is given 'for delivering high quality teaching, learning and outcomes for its students. It consistently exceeds rigorous national quality requirements for UK higher education' The award has come on the back of a successful year for the ...
Not sure who to vote for? Here are the party policies
Features

Not sure who to vote for? Here are the party policies

Not sure who to vote for? Confused about what all the politicians are saying? We took the party manifestos / policies and broke them down party-by-party, issue-by-issue.  With some (hopefully) helpful infographics too.  (These policies were correct at the time of writing)
Which? Report Criticises Universities for Unfair Changes
News

Which? Report Criticises Universities for Unfair Changes

The consumer group Which? has published a report revealing that students are routinely subjected to unfair changes to their university courses. These changes can occur after enrolment or even between years during a student’s degree. Which? found that 6 in 10 students have experienced course modifications such as changes to modules, location of teaching, or even their degree titles. Even more worryingly, 12% of us students are said to have experienced an increase in tuition fees either part-way through an academic year or between years. As students can now be charged up to £9,000 per year, this has led to claims that the higher education system is turning into a consumer market. Which? asserts that many of the London universities are guilty of unfair course changes (thankfully the report...
News

The UK higher education system’s best kept secret: How are our tuition fees spent?

According to the influential think tank, Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI), the majority of the UK’s leading universities are refusing to publish a breakdown of how each student’s £9,000 per year tuition fees are spent. HEPI contacted a range of institutions in order to uncover where students’ money goes, however according to director Nick Hillman, only ten universities responded to their inquiries. Leicester University, one of few to reply, indicates how it divvies up some of its £274 million annual budget, spending £168 million on academic colleges compared to just £16 million on libraries and computers. However, they failed to itemise how an individual student’s tuition fees are used. Hillman argues that if universities refuse to itemize how earnings are allocated, they ...