Monday, June 17Royal Holloway's offical student publication, est. 1986

Tag: play

You’d Be Wilde To Miss It
Culture & Literature, Theatre & Performance

You’d Be Wilde To Miss It

With a pre-existing collection of beautiful and comedic Wildian plays to choose from, I can’t deny I was surprised to hear that these options had been axed for the adaptation of the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray. However, upon leaving the performance I can without a doubt understand the decisions that compelled this magnificent choice. The Picture of Dorian Gray stands alone as Oscar Wilde’s only novel and tells the tale of the conflicting relationship between morality and pleasure which aids to the corruption of the the once beautiful soul of Dorian Gray. It is clear that the production team had this complicated motif in mind and executed it fantastically. Upon entering the hall, Basil Hallwood (Sean Simmons-Barry) is rotating between admiring his artwork and dabbing at the canvas w...
There’s nothing tame about this!
Culture & Literature, Theatre & Performance

There’s nothing tame about this!

Shakespeare Society’s always highly anticipated Summer Term production was a true triumph this year. The remarkable thing about this particular show is that it is entirely done by 1st years. This fact fills me with hope for the society’s future, as the already stellar work and passion by everyone in the whole cast and crew can only grow from this point onwards. The performance was held in the Boilerhouse Lecture Theatre, a vast space which is challenging to perform in due to lots of seating - which I was pleased to see very pleasantly filled. Stage manager Emma Currie set the space with a golden fringed backdrop and a small carpet of an art-deco design. The soundtrack of the roaring 20s was playing as the audience took their seats and during scene changes, which, alongside the costu...
An evening with the King himself
Culture & Literature, Theatre & Performance

An evening with the King himself

Having never seen a Shakespeare Society production before, I was unsure of what to expect of Director Bethany Wilkinson’s adaptation of the infamous tragedy, King Lear. King Lear is one of my favourite plays in the world and, being quite a traditionalist with regards to Shakespeare plays, I hoped that the play would do it justice. In some ways, it definitely did. In others, it did not. Before the play officially starts, as audience members file in, the play has clearly already started, introducing us to Lear from the beginning. Jack Davies as King Lear, epitomises the idea of a ‘mad King’ by trailing around the hall, mumbling nonsense and cackling maniacally. He moves into audience members’ personal space, balling up paper and throwing it at key targets - me included. He is mad, obvious...
The Devil is loose in Royal Holloway
Culture & Literature, Theatre & Performance

The Devil is loose in Royal Holloway

The Crucible was written by Arthur Miller in the 1950s as a comment on mass hysteria and the dangers of false accusation and is based on true events. Drama Society attempted to transport us to the small and suffocating town of Salem, Massachusetts where Miller’s plot of witchery and paranoia takes place - and it did not disappoint. Before it even begins, Tom Williams’ direction sets the erie tone with Tituba, played by Anna Tamela, on stage as the audience file in singing a quiet tune and mixing what we can only assume is a witch’s brew. Act One begins with ‘the girls’ emotive interpretive movement piece to Hozier’s Arsonist’s Lullaby setting the scene perfectly. The hysteria and screams start early and continually make several appearances, intensifying as they go on and effective in s...
The Nether – Review
Culture & Literature, Theatre & Performance

The Nether – Review

Bethany Wilkinson set herself a very difficult challenge – to direct a complicated, dark play in a very limited rehearsal period and present it in the, frankly, bare setting of the rehearsal room in the Drama department. She succeeded in completing this challenge and this can be vouched by the audience members who were lucky enough to witness this show (only 30 tickets per show for 2 performances were available). The Nether by Jennifer Haley is a look at a dystopian not-too-distant future where the internet grew into what is referred to as The Nether, a virtual reality system where users can live a consequence free existence and they can choose to transition into Shadows, living out a fantasy while their actual bodies wither away. The lead character, Detective Morris, is after a specifi...
Never Swim Alone – Review
Culture & Literature, Theatre & Performance

Never Swim Alone – Review

Image by Sophie Morgan Susanna Clark reviews The Student Workshop's production of Never Swim Alone. The Student Workshop’s production of Never Swim Alone is, simply put, a triumph. Frank (played by Jack Read) and Bill (played by Azan Ahmed) are two adult men who were once childhood friends and maintain a façade of the continuation of this friendship, despite their destructive rivalry. The play is structured as a competition with 13 rounds, each of which is judged by the referee (played by Tabatha Gregg). In each round the men attempt to prove their superiority over each other: whichever man argues his case best is awarded a point by the referee. The points are recorded on a whiteboard in a prime position for all to see: a reminder of the constant struggle amongst men to prove the...
Di and Viv and Rose
Culture & Literature, Theatre & Performance

Di and Viv and Rose

Beth Carr reviews The Student Workshop's first production of the term. Upon reading the synopsis for Di and Viv and Rose, it became impossible to resist buying a ticket and heading to see it. Following three girls from the beginning of their friendship at university into adulthood and the changes it brings, the Student Workshop's rehearsal room production brought the story to life intimately. With only 35 seats at each performance, the audience is sucked into the drama and humour of the lives of the three characters, and it is hard to imagine the play being performed in any other way. Putting three unknown first years in the spotlight was a risk that paid off and each reflected the different personalities of the characters with ease. To the women watching, as well as I hope the men, ...
A ‘Posh’ Performance by RHUL Drama Soc
Culture & Literature, Theatre & Performance

A ‘Posh’ Performance by RHUL Drama Soc

Royal Holloway Drama Society will be putting on the play 'Posh' by Laura Wade which is highly relevant in light of the upcoming general election in May. 'Posh' is based upon the infamous Bullingdon club - an exclusive but unofficial all male students' club at Oxford University noted for its wealthy members and riotous rituals such as trashing restaurants and university dorm rooms. The prestigious club has had famous members such as David Cameron, Boris Johnson and George Osbourne (Prime Minister, Mayor of London and the Chancellor of the Exchequer). The 2014 film version of 'The Riot Club' is an adaptation of the play which you may have encountered. So, if you have read the play or seen the film then you know the basic plot; a group of ten wealthy youths from Oxford University go to ...