Wednesday, June 19Royal Holloway's offical student publication, est. 1986

Tag: University

Have We Invested in Intimacy?
Lifestyle

Have We Invested in Intimacy?

By Tia Martello In an era where technology reigns supreme and the desire for immediate satisfaction prevails, the search for genuine connections has become more pressing than ever before. In a rapidly evolving world, the conventional criteria for measuring relationship success are undergoing a major transformation. As we navigate the complexities of modern romance, a fascinating question emerges: could intimacy be the new currency of our generation?  As we venture into the intricate realm of contemporary romance, it becomes increasingly clear that the traditional notions of love and connection are undergoing a significant transformation. In the era of current intimacy, dating apps have become the go-to method for finding love. With their enticing promise of a vast array of pote...
The Art of Growing Up: How to Progress Mentally in a Society that Stunts Our Growth
Lifestyle

The Art of Growing Up: How to Progress Mentally in a Society that Stunts Our Growth

By Lia Doyle In the last four years, the world has been turned on its head. The unpredictable nature of the future and the notion of growing up have become gloomy subjects to talk about amongst younger generations. What must our generation do in order to feel like we are not falling behind? What must we do to not be mentally affected by the world around us?  There is a subtle art to growing up, to growing older and wiser, that people seem to keep a secret. We can endlessly ask our grandparents for their advice on what to do in this all-consuming world, but any piece of wisdom can seem overwhelming. A look back on my childhood and teenage life reflects to me that there is a certain “je ne sais quoi” to growing up. Here is my advice about how to grow up and to feel okay about it....
Failure is Part of Progression
Opinion

Failure is Part of Progression

By Ruby Caballero-Roff I didn’t pass my driving test for the first time at age seventeen. I didn’t go to university the September I turned 18. I did not have a huge balloon-filled party at age 21. I felt like I had failed, but I hadn’t.  I’ve always found that making progress is far too often linked with age and meeting goals we assume we will reach as we grow older. These goals are then combined and linked to your personal success as a person. Goals can be positive, uplifting, and remarkable, and all these achievements at such a young age give you countless boasting rights. A CV filled with confidence when applying to universities or a bedroom drawer filled with certificates (not just participation awards) — your progress has given you a childhood full of success, but will th...
University is the Most Confusing Time of your Life, and No One Talks About it
Opinion

University is the Most Confusing Time of your Life, and No One Talks About it

By Claudia Macaluso Picture this. You’re eighteen, it's Christmas Eve, you’re sitting around a table with loads of people who you’re apparently related to, and you suddenly get asked this question: “So how’s uni?” And you shudder, thinking to yourself, “How could I possibly answer that nonchalantly?” The truth is, university is undoubtedly the strangest time of your life, and you’re not given enough credit for it. Everyone anticipates this moment for most of their teenage years, and yet when the time comes, you turn into this tiny goldfish who gets tossed into a massive aquarium full of fish species you’ve never even heard of before. One of my friends once told me, "I would love university if I didn’t actually have to do university.” You’ve been in education your entire life, yet...
Loosen Your Stitching
Opinion

Loosen Your Stitching

By Kiera Garcia When living in an age where identity is everything, the idea of fluidity appears to be a perilous game. We're expected to know who we are, our desires, and our beliefs, and know exactly how to articulate those thoughts. I know that I fell victim to the idea that if I hadn't had my whole life figured out by the time I was 18, I would have failed at life. After coming to university and having the subsequent almost quarter-life crisis of realising that I did not have my entire self figured out already, I realised how dull and colourless life would be if I never changed. The idea of being the same as I was when I was 13, and even the same as when I was 17, frightened me. This does not make the process of evolving and developing your identity any easier. The cliché of ...
Some Things Never Change: Body Positivity or Toxicity?
Lifestyle, Opinion

Some Things Never Change: Body Positivity or Toxicity?

By Beth McCowen As the weather gets hotter, and the events that have been in our diaries for months are finally rolling around, it’s time to switch up our wardrobes to include some summer attire after months and months of cosy jumpers and trendy scarves. As joyful as the sunshine, floral dresses, and holidays can feel, this transition in season, and therefore style, is easier for some than it is for others. Throughout the autumn, winter and even spring months, we often grow used to hiding away our bodies, our insecurities, under clothes in which we feel comfortable, usually on the basis that they show less of our skin than the alternatives that are more practical for the summer.  For those who have struggled with eating disorders, other health problems, or difficult relatio...
The Democratic Downfall of Journalism
Opinion

The Democratic Downfall of Journalism

Daniel Pearl was an American journalist. Near the time of his abduction and death, he had been working in Mumbai, India as the Southeast Asia bureau chief of The Wall Street Journal, but had travelled with his family to Karachi, Pakistan to report on the United States’ War on Terrorism following the 9/11 attacks by Al-Qaeda in 2001. Pearl was recognised for his journalistic detail and his ability to empathise with how humanity - and our own human nature - is affected by international issues. Consequently, he was considerate of the reported portrayal of the Islamic world towards his Western readers. Nevertheless, during his time in Karachi in early 2002, Pearl was kidnapped and murdered by several Islamist jihadist groups working together, operating under the Lashkar-e-Omar umbrella. ...
<strong>‘Positive’ Discrimination: Race, Language and Labels</strong>
Opinion

‘Positive’ Discrimination: Race, Language and Labels

‘… “Reverse discrimination”, which translates to “Keep those Negroes running – but in their same old place”.’  – Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnics). POC and BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of colour). Catch-all, pre-packaged tags ready to slap on those boxes we call ‘people’, when we feel so inclined. Establishment guarantee included, free of charge. My gripe with race terminology has long been one of passive resistance yet complicit subscription. This is my guilty confession; more so, this is a personal attempt to unravel the netting of politically correct and functionally useless labels which colour (pun intended) our ever-growing vocabulary of racial identification.  A few mandatory disclaimers before I let loose. Conversations...
Romanticising University Life
Lifestyle

Romanticising University Life

Romanticising simple tasks, such as a trip to the shops, walking to a lecture, or going into Egham for a coffee is something we are all guilty of. There is a feeling of comfort which arises by putting on a big coat and your favourite playlist and idly making your way around campus. The extravagant Founders building and the warm colours of Autumn which currently adorn Royal Holloway are the perfect complement to romanticising your university life.  Romanticising your life can play a crucial part in cheering yourself up on gloomy days of Autumn and Winter. As busy students, we should allow ourselves to occasionally follow the beckoning lights of a local cafe or the friendly call of a day exploring charity shops (it is self-care really). Even revision can be made enjoyable when it is...
Searching for a Home: Connection through Crises
News, Opinion

Searching for a Home: Connection through Crises

As I sat down to write this article, it suddenly struck me just how wide and complex the word ‘connection' is. At its core, connection has these profound connotations of a bond, of intimacy, of emotion. Yet we apply ‘connection’ to acquaintances and social media friends. On LinkedIn we ask a stranger to ‘connect’ in the name of professional development. We connect the dots, and play Connect 4.  Most recently, connection has been used to talk about current crises from the Russian war on Ukraine to climate change. Now with Ukrainians being forced to find refuge in countless countries across Europe, we might wonder how this changes our viewpoint on connection.  Yuliya, who recently fled Ukraine, told me her story. Below is her account of what happened.  “I was born an...